Posts Tagged ‘bathroom’

Starting Without A Plan

Imagine taking a trip to a new city without a map, a GPS, or even directions to your final destination. How would you ever get there? That's what organizing without a plan is like — you can make as much forward progress as you like, but you have no idea if you're even headed the right way (in fact, you might just be going in the exact opposite direction of where you would like to end up!)

Before beginning any organizing project, think about what you want to accomplish — what your life will look like when you're done. From there, you can figure out the steps you will need to take, and your timeline for each phase. But knowing where you are going prior to starting out is the only guaranteed way to reach your destination.

Not Cleaning Out Before You Organize

Organizing involves more than just moving your stuff around. Decluttering is about devoting your space to those objects that you actually use and love — and being willing to let go of the rest. If you want your organizing experience to be a successful one, expect to make some hard decisions about what to keep and what to get rid of.

Before you start worrying about organizing supplies and storage containers, begin with a full-scale purge. Go through your stacks and piles, and pull out anything that you don't use, need, or want anymore — functional items in the “donate” bin, the rest in the recycle or the trash. If you clear out the excess first, you'll have less to organize and the rest of the process will be a snap.

Using Opaque Storage Containers With No Labels

All the space in the world won't do you a bit of good if you can't see what you're storing. Many people waste as much time searching for items that they have “organized” (read as “hidden out-of-sight and out-of-mind”) — as they did when it was all just heaped together in a pile! You should never have to guess where you have put something away.

Your best choice is a clear container that allows you to see what's inside. You're less likely to lose things when you can tell a box's contents without ever having to remove the lid. If you must use an opaque tub, be sure to clearly label it — and be specific! That means going a step farther with your descriptions — not just “Christmas decorations,” but “Christmas lights” or “holiday candles” or “tree ornaments.”

Saying “I'll Put It Here For Now”

One of the biggest mistakes you can make with your storage is creating “in-between” spots for your belongings. The minute you say, “I'll deal with it away later” — you've not only created extra work for yourself later (two steps instead of one), but you have also diminished your chances of actually putting the damned thing away at all!

Rather than sitting something down in the first place you see, make sure you have a set home for each item and a logical reason for putting it there. Cleaning up is quick and easy when you know that your iron lives on the shelf above the washing machine,  and your whisk belongs in the third drawer from the stove. Not to mention the fact that you will actually be able to find that item again when you next need it.

Failing To Subdivide Big Open Spaces

A lot of storage spaces are so big that they become almost impractical. Just dumping your stuff into a huge gaping closet or cabinet doesn't make you organized — in fact, this sort of arrangement can actually encourage clutter. Sometimes it's better to break large spaces up into smaller components.

When dealing with oversized storage, try to find some way to compartmentalize collections of small items. Desk drawers just beg for dividers, your kitchen pantry becomes more manageable with a few shelves, the tools in the garage can be hung on racks, and the extra toiletries in your bathroom closet are less messy when placed in containers.

Ignoring Your Dead Space

Most people wish for expanded storage, but you actually have more room than you think — if you look in the right places. Glance around and see if you've been overlooking spots that contain unrealized organizational possibilities. Taking advantage of underutilized “dead space” can sometimes double or triple your available storage.

Don't forget about the areas under beds, on the backs of doors, near the ceiling, and on the floor.  Hang tools and sports equipment in the garage, hats and belts in the closet, and kid's school bags in your mud room or entryway. Less accessible spots in the basement, garage, and attic are particularly good for storing items you don't get at very often — like holiday decorations and memorabilia.

Failing To Make Adjustments

Remember that your storage is a dynamic system — it should continue to evolve as your interests and lifestyle change. The system you set up today may serve your every need right now, but will it still work for you in a year or two? Organization is a journey, not a destination. And while you can certainly clear up your clutter worries, it takes regular maintenance and revision of your systems to keep it that way.

The key to lasting organization is flexibility — don't be afraid to make changes to your systems when necessary. Keep an eye out for systems that need a little tweaking. If you're experiencing frustrations, can't find what you're looking for, or seem to have run out of space, it's time for an overhaul.

Filling Your Storage To Capacity

Do you ever plan to buy anything new ever again? Even those of us who are committed minimalists are going to eventually bring home a new acquisition — it's unavoidable! But if you stuff your storage spaces to overflowing, where will you put your purchases?

As you organize, think about leaving some free space — room to grow. The general rule of thumb is that you should always have about 15% of your storage unoccupied — that way, when you do go shopping, you won't have to worry about “making” a spot for the newcomers. But if you can't manage that, institute a “one-in/one-out” rule — every time you bring something into your house, something else has to go away. With a little discipline, you'll never run out of room again!

Storing Items Too Far Away

It may seem like common sense, but we don't always think to put things nearest the point where we use them. A poor choice  of storage location makes daily life vastly more complicated than it needs to be! The most direct route to “efficient” is via “convenient,” so keep your storage close to where that activity occurs.

Make an effort to look at your storage with a critical eye — asking yourself if a simple shift in geography would relieve some of your stress. Then feel free to move objects around if your current system doesn't make sense. You don't want to have to walk across your office every time you need something off of the printer — and your child is less likely to put his dirty towel in the hamper if it's in the other room.

Skipping The Yearly Purge

Don't think that once you have set up your storage spaces, you can simply sit back and rest on your laurels. You may be “done” for now, but your system is going to need a little annual TLC if you expect it to keep the clutter at bey. Sure, if you set up an organized space and then never touched it, things would remain in good order — but daily use, changing needs, and the addition of new “stuff” will kill good organization if you aren't careful!

You need to take some time at least once a year to sort through your belongings — pulling out anything that is broken, hasn't been used in the past 12 months, or has become obsolete. The best time for this is during a natural point of transition like a change in the seasons — spring cleaning, back to school, or the New Year.

Plan Before You Organize

Before you can create an organizing “grand plan,” you need to takestock of your belongings — it's time for an inventory! Do you have sporting goods stashed in different areas throughoutthe house, clothes in three different closets, no set home for all those extra electrical cords, and miscellaneous”homeless” items scattered here and there? Let's go on a room-by-room tour and start gathering like items together into piles. Be sure tocollect up everything (and I mean everything) you want to store in a particular spacebefore you begin organizing — leave no stone unturned, open every cabinet, look in every drawer, sift through all the piles. There is nothing more frustrating thandesigning the perfect closet, then realizing you forgot 15 pairsof shoes that were hidden away under the bed!

You also can't concoct a truly useful organizing solution unless you have an end in mind. Start by asking yourself what you want from your storage. Are you concerned about maximizing space? Being able to see everything you own? Protecting your treasures? Cutting down on time spent dusting? Creating a focal point for the room? Displaying or concealing your belongings? Keep these objectives in mind as you work — your choice of supplies and storage location will depend on what you hope to accomplish with your organizing efforts. Everything you do — whether it's cleaning out or buying a container or expanding a closet — should take you one step closer to these goals.

Location, Location, Location

Look around your house — do you see anything that is clearly out of place? Any bowling balls stored in the kitchen or power tools thrown in with the toys? Don't laugh — I've actually seen both of these situations! You might think that you're “organizing” your home when you put an item away in the first available cabinet or closet — but your storage will serve you better if you think in terms of logical categories. Begin by sorting your belongings according to purpose — sports, travel, grooming, etc. Then group similar items together — travel accessories with your luggage, rags in the same place as other cleaning equipment, office supplies in one spot. Don't forget accessories and related items — keep the knife sharpener with your cutlery and the extra bits with the drill.

A large part of being organized is having a set spot for everything you own. As you sort through your stuff, create a pile of “homeless items” that need to be incorporated into your storage. Then do your best to find a logical place for each — no halfway spots allowed! Each time you assign an item to a space, ask yourself why you are putting it there. Because it's close to where you will use it? Because it will be easy to see or reach? Because that's the first place you would think to look for it? If you don't have a good reason for storing an item in a certain place, please rethink your decision. The worst mistake you can make is to randomly stash your belongings around your home or office — how will you ever find them again? You shouldn't have to guess!

Strive to choose a storage space that is appropriate forit's contents. There are many factors to consider — such as anobject's size, shape, “breakability,” and weight. Are you storing heavyboxes on a high shelf? Sounds like a concussion waiting to happen! Andyou should always try to match form with function as you evaluate yourstorage spaces — how can you best use shallow shelves, a tall thincabinet, or a deep desk drawer? Organizing requires a balance betweencreativity and common sense.

Movement Matters

Getting at your belongings shouldn't require a lot of strain or effort. Take a quick look at your existing storage — do you have to bend and stretch and squat in order to reach items you use all the time? You can make your life great deal easier by keeping motion in mind as you organize.

Every space in your home or office can be categorized according to ease of accessibility — your job is to think about how (and how often) you use each of your belongings, and assign that item to the correct type of storage. You really have three to choose from. Those spaces that fall at or near eye-level are considered primary storage and should be reserved for items you access on a daily basis. If your primary storage is cluttered with objects you rarely touch, consider moving these items a bit further away — to a secondary storage area between knee and shoulder height. And what do you do with those incredibly inaccessible spaces — such as the garage, high cabinets, or the back of the closet? This tertiary storage is meant for items that you use only a few times a year — like holiday decorations, memorabilia, and archived records.

Storage Considerations

You can't just throw any old box of stuff in a storage space and call it “organized.” Even those items that you wouldn't normally consider to be “fragile” can be damaged if they are improperly packed away. Attics, garages, and basements are usually the worst offenders — thanks to the extremes of temperature and moisture. Are your storage spaces climate-controlled? Do they get really hot in the summer? Cold in the winter? Damp when it rains or is humid? Do you have problems with insects or other rodents? You may need to wrap or seal an item, toss in some cedar chips, or purchase a special container to keep your treasures safe. And if you think there is any chance of damage in this location, pick a different storage space.

Now, let me ask whether your storage paraphernalia is helping or hindering your organizing efforts. Have you ever had to open 6 different boxes to find what you were looking for? Organizing supplies should make your life easier, not more difficult! Use see-through clear plastic containers and label everything — shelves included. You should immediately recognize the contents simply by looking at the container. Accessories such as drawer trays, shelf dividers, lazy susans, pull-out baskets, and stackable shelves can also help you make the most of your storage by subdividing larger spaces.

Remember that organization is an ever-changing and dynamic part of your life. You can't just set up a storage system and think that you are “finished.” As you acquire new possessions, as your lifestyle and interests change, your storage needs will evolve. Be willing to adjust your system as necessary — what seemed like a good idea at one point may require some improvement down the road!

A Faster Way To Get It All Done

Most people's days are so filled to overflowing with responsibilities, that there's is almost no way to get it all done in the hours available. Some things (like work and school and appointments) eat up big chunks of your day, and you have little control over when or how they happen. Others can be squeezed in whenever you've got a few free minutes here or there. The trick to successful time management is making effective and productive use of “micro-moments” — little chunks of time scattered throughout your day, in-between the other bigger commitments. Instead of watching TV, why not get something meaningful accomplished? Any time you can cross a to-do off your list during one of these normally “wasted” periods of time, you're one step ahead of the game.
  • wrap and mail a gift you've been meaning to send off
  • pay the bills that have been sitting on the counter waiting for your attention
  • clean out a cabinet or a drawer that's been driving you up the wall
  • repair a ripped hem
  • respond to a couple of emails or return a few phone calls
  • set out your clothes for the next day
  • make tomorrow's lunch today
  • sew a missing button
  • tackle a small home “fix-it” project (tighten a screw, hang a picture, etc.)
  • do the dishes and wipe down the counters
  • run the vacuum or sweep the floor
  • throw a load of laundry in the washer or dryer
  • put away a pile of clutter that's been staring you in the face for too long
  • clean out your purse, briefcase, or backpack
  • read that magazine article or book you haven't had time for
  • schedule an appointment you've been putting off
  • sort through your incoming mail, separating to-do's from trash
  • reorganize your CDs or DVDs in categorical / alphabetical order
  • gather up outdated magazines and newspapers to put in the recycling

See how easy that was? Wink

A Faster Way To Clean

Cleaning day — what an old-fashioned notion! The idea that you should give up one entire day of your week for scrubbing and mopping might have been appropriate when folks didn't have jobs outside the house — but this system doesn't work so well with modern schedules. It's hard for busy families with working parents and afterschool activities and other responsibilities to fit in a whole day for housework. And when you work 9-5 Monday through Friday, you surely don't want to sacrifice your “off” days to chores. More importantly, there's no reason you should have to — if you stay on top of the dirt throughout the week. Each time you have a few free minutes, why not take care of one small cleaning job, rather than saving it all up? That way, you can finish your cleaning by the end of the week, leaving the weekend for fun!

  • wipe splatters and fingerprints off the bathroom mirrors
  • clean the ring out of the toilet and wipe down the seat
  • wipe down the bathroom counters
  • wash your bathroom rugs
  • wipe down the tub and shower walls with disinfectant
  • load your dishwasher and let it run while you do something else
  • empty your dishwasher and put the dishes away
  • wipe down the kitchen counters
  • clean the grease and food splatters off your stove top and vent hood
  • wipe down the inside shelves and veggie drawers of your refrigerator with disinfectant
  • empty your trashcans and take out the trash
  • put a load of laundry in the washer or dryer
  • fold some clean clothes
  • hang up your clean laundry
  • make your bed
  • change the sheets
  • vacuum, sweep, or mop in one room
  • dust one room (or if you have big rooms with lots of nick-nacks, just one shelf)
  • wash the windows in one room
  • go around the house with a lint roller or brush and clean pet hair off the furniture

See how easy that was? Wink

A Faster Way To Organize Your Home

There's so much to do when you're running a household — just keeping your physical space in order and making sure your family is properly fed can be a full-time job! However, most people can't (and don't want to) spend all week on chores, because they have other responsibilities to think about — so you have to find ways to make those routine everyday tasks take less time. The good news is that the right household environment naturally makes everything easier — that includes meals, getting ready in the morning, and clean-up. You know that old saying, “A stitch in time saves nine”? Well that's what it's all about — investing a little bit of energy up front to create a system that works for you will save a lot of unnecessary work down the road!

  • walk through one room in the house and put away anything that is out of place
  • set up a basket at the base / top of the stairs for items that need to go up / down
  • gather up every book in you own in one specific category (self-help, history, biography, etc.)
  • organize one grouping / category / author of books alphabetically on your shelves
  • set up your pills and vitamins for the week in a daily dosage container — AM, mid-day, PM
  • move everything  for your AM routine (coffee/tea, meds, supplements) together into one cabinet
  • group all of one kind of food (cereals, canned goods, baking items, etc.) together in your pantry
  • put all loose bulk food items in lidded containers in your pantry — don't forget to label them
  • figure out your menu for the week, including page numbers for the recipes
  • write out a grocery shopping list for the week's meals
  • chop / marinate / prep your veggies and meat (in containers in the fridge) for the week's meals
  • cook a batch of a favorite dish (spaghetti sauce, soup, lasagna, etc.) and freeze individual servings
  • rinse your dishes right after each meal to prevent food from drying and becoming stuck on them
  • choose outfits for each day of the next week, including shoes and accessories
  • separate your casual clothes from dressy, or summer from winter, or work from play in your closet
  • put all of your shoes on racks or in labeled boxes by pairs
  • set up bins for separating out “dry cleaning,” “repairs,” and “alterations” in your closet
  • break your gift wrap paper / bags / tags / bows / ribbon into separate labeled tubs
  • clear your bathroom counter of everything except what you use daily for your grooming routine
  • set up an area at each entryway where visitors can remove their shoes to keep from tracking dirt in

See how easy that was? Wink